News Room

Media Contacts

Amaya Smith

Amaya Smith

Position: Vice President for Marketing and Communications
Phone: (202) 986-2600
Email: asmith@nationalpartnership.org
Categories: Media

Amaya Smith is vice president for marketing and communications at the National Partnership for Women & Families. In that role she oversees strategic messaging as well as digital and earned communications around issues important to women and families. These issues include reproductive justice, women’s health care and workplace fairness. Smith works to ensure that stakeholders and the public understand that women’s health and reproductive freedom is inextricably entwined with economic justice. Before joining National Partnership she served as Communications Director and Strategic Advisor to the President, at the AFL-CIO. Prior to joining the AFL-CIO Smith served as a Press Secretary for the American Association for Justice (AAJ). She also served as the South Carolina Press Secretary for the Obama for America campaign during the 2008 Democratic primary.

Smith developed experience working with diverse media outlets and constituencies as a Regional Press Secretary for the Democratic National Committee, where she handled press for the women’s, African American, labor, faith, college and youth communities. She got her start in legislative advocacy working for former Congressman Albert R. Wynn, her local representative. She served as a Communications Director for Congressman Wynn for four years and built relationships with Capitol Hill and Washington reporters. Smith is a graduate of American University and is originally from Silver Spring, Md. Her passion for social justice and women’s health comes from a mom who is a retired registered nurse and an eternal activist.

Amaya Smith

Vice President for Marketing and Communications
Llenda Jackson Leslie

Llenda Jackson-Leslie

Position: Senior Communications Specialist
Phone: (202) 986-2600
Email: ljackson-leslie@nationalpartnership.org
Categories: Media

Llenda Jackson-Leslie is a senior communications specialist at the National Partnership for Women & Families, where she works to showcase reproductive health and health care issues.

Prior to her work at the National Partnership, Llenda was a senior communications associate at McKinney & Associates, where she led campaigns on transformative justice, gender justice and health equity. Previously, she served as director of legislative communications for the American Civil Liberties Union where she managed communications initiatives to reauthorize the Voting Rights Act.

A native Detroiter, Llenda served as communications director for Michigan’s largest trial court and marketing director for the Detroit Branch NAACP before moving to Washington, D.C.

Llenda Jackson-Leslie

Senior Communications Specialist
Gail Zuagar

Gail Zuagar

Position: Senior Communications Specialist
Phone: (202) 986-2600
Email: gzuagar@nationalpartnership.org
Categories: Media

Gail Zuagar is a senior communications specialist at the National Partnership for Women & Families, where she works to amplify the organization’s economic justice work to a range of audiences. Prior to joining the National Partnership, Gail developed a passion for combining communications with advocacy and outreach in previous roles at The Education Trust and the National Women’s Law Center.

Gail earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Temple University and her master’s degree in public relations and corporate communications from Georgetown University. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and their children.

Gail Zuagar

Senior Communications Specialist

For general inquiries, please email press@nationalpartnership.org.

Press Statements

Supreme Court Does Bare Minimum in Case That Never Should Have Happened

Supreme Court Does Bare Minimum in Case That Never Should Have Happened

Today, the Supreme Court ruled the Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine lacked standing to challenge the FDA's approval of mifepristone, one of two medications commonly used in medication abortion.

Lack of Abortion Care Hurts Overall Health and Economic Well-Being

Lack of Abortion Care Hurts Overall Health and Economic Well-Being

NPWF President Jocelyn C. Frye testified as an expert witness in the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Federal Courts, Oversight, Agency Action, and Federal Rights' hearing on "Crossing the Line: Abortion Bans and Interstate Travel for Care After Dobbs."

National Partnership Launches Application for Businesses Offering Paid Leave

National Partnership Launches Application for Businesses Offering Paid Leave

Today, the National Partnership for Women & Families opened its "Leading on Leave Index" application to business and human resources leaders at companies across the U.S.

Report Details Voters’ Access to Ballot Box Restricted in States that Restrict Abortion

Report Details Voters’ Access to Ballot Box Restricted in States that Restrict Abortion

In our new report, Democracy & Abortion Access: Restrictive Voting Laws Threaten Freedoms, we found that the states with abortion bans and other severe restrictions are among the states with the most repressive voting measures.

NPWF Recognizes First Disability Reproductive Equity Day

NPWF Recognizes First Disability Reproductive Equity Day

We are joining advocates in recognizing the first Disability Reproductive Equity Day, a day dedicated to promoting the bodily autonomy and dignity of disabled people, on May 23, 2024.

News Coverage

The Equal Pay Act passed over 60 years ago. So, why do women still make less than men? – USA Today

The Equal Pay Act passed over 60 years ago. So, why do women still make less than men? – USA Today

“For every dollar men earn today, women across the board earn 78 cents, according to US Census Bureau data analysis by the National Partnership for Women & Families.”

“…On average, women employed in the United States lose a combined total of more than $1.6 trillion every year due to the wage gap,” according to a report from the National Partnership for Women and Families. Families, businesses and the economy suffer as a result.”

The Equal Pay Act passed over 60 years ago. So, why do women still make less than men? – USA Today

The abortion crisis is crushing Black women. The numbers don’t lie. – Reckon News

“About 57% of all Black women ages 15-49 live in states with abortion bans, and 55% live in states with both abortion bans and above average maternal mortality, according to analysis released by National Partnership for Women & Families (NPWF) and In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda last week. Further escalating the effects of not having legal access to abortion where they live, the fact that 2.7 million Black women living in these states are economically insecure, and more likely to lack the funds necessary to travel to access abortion in another state.”

The Equal Pay Act passed over 60 years ago. So, why do women still make less than men? – USA Today

If you thought rent was bad, child care now costs more than housing in all 50 states – Fortune

“The problems that contribute to expensive care are multifold and can be understood by taking a close look at how the market is funded, according to Jocelyn Frye, the president of the National Partnership for Women & Families, a nonprofit that works to improve lives.

‘It’s a perfect storm in terms of a number of things coming together,’ Frye told Fortune. ‘Families are struggling across the country, the costs are going up, the number of child-care workers has not yet rebounded fully from pre-pandemic numbers, the costs of operating child-care facilities are escalating and we don’t pay child-care workers themselves enough.'”

The Equal Pay Act passed over 60 years ago. So, why do women still make less than men? – USA Today

Almost 7M Black women of reproductive age have little, no abortion access: Research – The Hill

“The analysis from National Partnership for Women & Families and In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda found that nearly 7 million Black women ages 15-49 live in the 26 states that have banned or are likely to ban abortion.

The number of states to ban or limit abortion care has increased since the 2022 Supreme Court case that overturned Roe v. Wade, which guaranteed the right to abortion.”